Daily backups offer a balance between minimizing data loss & minimizing load on server/site. Is it, however, the most optimum WordPress backup frequency for your WordPress site? Here’s what you need to know about the different methods; and the pros and cons of each of them.

 

Daily backups are the most practical backup frequency for a majority of WordPress sites that have scheduled updates every day.

 

Daily WordPress Backups

Who is it for?

Daily backups are a good option for sites which make numerous changes in a month. These may be blogs that predominantly have content additions everyday, or news/magazine sites which have scheduled daily updates.

Even if daily changes are not made to your site, daily backups may be worth considering. WordPress sites depend on plugins, and themes. As you well know updates to plugins and themes, along with updates to WordPress Core are very important for the sake of your site’s security, and functionality.

Updates are not released at the same time and different plugins and themes have to be updated regularly. While these updates are important, they are part of a complex mix of softwares that together form your WordPress site. If you make an update and the site crashes then it is easy to pinpoint the problem. Often this is not the case. Problems only surface days; maybe weeks after a handful of changes are made. In such cases identifying the issue is a laborious matter.

Performing daily backups ensures that such updates are also saved. You can then restore your site with minimal or no data loss, and figure out any issue affecting your website, later. When you restore your site, fewer of those updates have to be made to harden your site’s security. Otherwise, without those updates, even if you restore your site it may have many vulnerabilities putting you at constant risk.

 

Advantages of Daily Backups

Good backup solutions optimize between resources consumed and efficiency. Daily backups bring the following advantages:

  • Reduces data loss
  • Provides the option of multiple backup versions to test and restore
  • Requires least tinkering once restored – updates made to plugins and themes can be retained.

 

Methods for Making Daily Backups

You can make daily backups in a few different ways. While all the methods used to make daily backups will offer the above mentioned advantages, each method also brings its own challenges. Let us explore them one by one.

Manual Backups

Making manual backups of your WordPress site is an additional, laborious job to add to  your everyday business task list. Remembering to make backups or taking out the time for it may not always be possible.

Securely storing backups is another issue that you are solely responsible for while making manual backups. HDDs or external HDDs or USB drives have been known to fail. Local storage devices, and the data stored in them can also become infected with malware.

Testing backups before restoring/migrating them can become a challenge when you are making manual backups and storing them locally.

Web Hosting Service

While many web hosting services offer backups and it is a seemingly convenient option, it is important to note that not all hosting services offer daily backups. Most of the time, premium web hosts like Flywheel, and WP Engine that do offer daily backups come at a premium price. Sometimes web hosts offer other backups solutions as add-ons and these come with additional costs.

A premium price tag may not be the only drawback when you choose your hosting service as your WordPress backup service. Backups with web hosts don’t have backup descriptions, which makes identifying and restoring the right version a very tedious process. Also, if your backups are stored by your web hosts then they might not be completely independent of your site. It means that your backups may be exposed to all the risks to which your site is exposed. For example, if your hosting service is hacked or the infrastructure is affected by a natural disaster, then chances are that along with your website, your backups are also lost. This is not an ideal way to store backups.

WordPress Backup Plugin

Some backup plugins are free and allow you to schedule your WordPress backups. While these plugins will help you perform daily backups, storage may be an added issue for you to consider. This is because not all plugins offer independent storage options. You can link your cloud storage account (for example, your Dropbox account) to these plugins. Doing so, however, usually means that the plugins store an API key of these accounts on your WordPress site. API keys are how the backup plugins communicate with your backup destination. However, it exposes backups to similar risks as your site. This may allow for your backups to be compromised when your site is hacked.

Backup plugins have to be installed on your site. If you lose access to your site for some reason then using the plugin to restore your site is not possible.

Tip: If you decide to use a WordPress backup plugin it may become important for you to track your WordPress site’s traffic. Backups can be resource intensive and making a backup when most visitors come to your site might slow the site and spoil the user experience.

WordPress Backup Service

A WordPress backup service offers a more complete  backups solution. Backup services perform incremental backups and automatically upload backups to completely independent storage.

Incremental backups mean that only those parts of the site which have changed since the last backup are stored. This means that you do not have to worry about large sites not getting backed up, or about forgetting to perform backups.

Backup storage comes as part of the service and you do not have risk using your personal accounts. Backup services also offer simplified processes for restoring and migrating your site. BlogVault offers you a one-click, test restore option which allows you test your sites on an automatically generated staging environment, before restoring them.

 

Choosing a WordPress backup frequency and solution for your site depends on a few factors– budget, frequency of changes to the site, time available, and the size of the site. There is a case to be made for daily backups as the most optimum frequency for most sites, barring sites with a high frequency of changes like e-commerce or news sites, (which might need solutions providing real-time backups instead). Knowing the advantages and challenges with making daily backups can help you make an informed decision.

 

By now you most probably would have come across this story which has taken the internet by storm recently, especially the programming community. The story reads:  How a hosting company lost its entire business because of one line of bad code. Any person even vaguely familiar with command prompt can guess that one line:
rm -rf

(well the actual line of code as per its author was rm -rf {foo}/{bar})

 

The issue first came to public notice when the person responsible for this catastrophe asked for help on ServerFault (question now removed). As per the question and followed thread of comments author intended to run a script that did a few task along with deleting all files/folders inside certain folders passed as variable. Due to an error in the code, the variable got wrong value which resulted in wiping everything on the machine. Unfortunately he ran this same script on all his machines which led to deletion of everything. A complete annihilation!

 

Add to that he ran a web hosting company. He not only deleted his entire company code and data but also wiped clean all customer data. This affected some 1535 customers who were using his service (figures provided by him on serverfault’s thread).

 

Did he take backups?

Whenever a person read such stories, first thing to come across mind is – why didn’t he take backups? Well as per him, he did. He made backups on separate disks, however these disks were mounted to the main machine and hence the contagious script managed to wipe them too.

 

He posted a comment that read:

“All servers got deleted and the offsite backups too because the remote storage was mounted just before by the same script (that is a backup maintenance script).”

 

We often come across users who are trying our service and tell us at the end of trial period, while they really loved our service their hosting company provides backup and hence they may not need our service. It’s difficult to explain why you cannot blindly rely on backups done by your hosting provider but this certainly is a good example to start with.

 

We understand it’s a rare case scenario coupled with human error and probability of something like this happening with your premium managed hosting provider is equivalent to probability of discovering extraterrestrial life. But the important thing to notice here is there is still a probability. There are over 1 billion websites on the internet today, even mere 0.1% accounts to 1 million websites and that’s a huge number. You definitely don’t want to be one in this million group.

 

If something similar happens with the managed hosting provider you are signed up with, your included backups will do you no good. This hosting company just lost all its data. Yes it was because of the carelessness of the system admin but human errors can happen anywhere. There can be another similar case, where a hacker somehow breaks into your hosting company’s server and run similar script intentionally. That will affect you equally. Not only your production site is gone, also the backups.

You should never completely rely on backups by your hosts

Though there are many managed hosting companies that provide quality automated backup to their customers, one should not completely rely on these backups especially when the site in question is your main source to bread and butter. If their system is compromised, so are you and your sites. We cannot emphasise enough how important it is to have backups completely independent from your hosting servers.  


Let’s assume another case where your hosting company is hit by a major DoS attack and it went completely down for 3-4 days. Your site data may be safe but there is no way to access it. There is no certainty how soon they will recover and you cannot let your site just hang around like that. Since your backup belongs with the same hosting company, there is no way to access them either. Like it or not, you’re stuck. If only your backups were independent, you could have hosted them somewhere else meanwhile.

 

These are real world examples and can happen to anyone. A good backup needs to be offsite, robust, completely independent from your main servers and most importantly something you can access and deploy anywhere within minutes. We have seen enough number of times people despite having zip of their backup, running over various tech forums desperately seeking professional help to get their site restored because just unzipping it won’t bring the site back. There are various server configurations that may require fixing/updating in wake of recent disaster. Similarly a good robust backup should have an easy way to validate itself. Consider a situation where you are relying on a backup which is corrupt and you only learn this when you needed it. It’s a nightmare! While most managed hostings do provide decent backup service, these are a few scenarios where they fall flat.

 

Our post is not aimed to scare our readers, we just want to educate people about the importance of an independent automated backup service. One can never take their system for granted. As per the very nature of machines they are bound to crash, hacked, wiped out, melt down etc. One need to have sound backup system not just for their sake, but also for the sake of their users. And we just happen to provide one 🙂

Pausing a WordPress site’s backups is easy with the BlogVault dashboard. This can be done by clicking on the BlogVault dashboard’s “Pause Backup” button in the Menu Bar of the Site Details page. Doing so would pause ongoing backups and put all future backups for the site on hold.


Pause or Resume backups with BlogVault
from BlogVault on Vimeo.
The details of the last backup performed of your sites, as well as when the next backup is scheduled, can be found on the Site Listing/ My Sites page, as soon as you log in to the BlogVault dashboard.

The Site Listing page showing when your sites were last backed up and when they will be backed up next
The Site Listing page showing when your sites were last backed up and when they will be backed up next

Clicking on the site in question from this page will take you to its Site Details page.

You can pause the backup by clicking on ‘Pause/Resume Sync’ feature in the header of the Site Details page. Pausing the backup of your site would stop the sync and backup operations of the Backup, Management and Security modules on your BlogVault dashboard. This would also stop all future automatic backups on your site from taking place at their daily scheduled times, so it’s important that you resume backups once you’re done.

 

Pausing a backup
Pausing a backup

Resuming the backup is as simple as clicking the same button again.

Resuming a backup
Resuming a backup

Pausing and resuming a backup allows you to make changes to your site, and then back up said changes. This lets you plan backups, and have instrumental changes saved. The ‘History’ feature under the Backup module of the BlogVault dashboard allows you to track these changes and even add notes to backup versions so you know exactly what changes were made between backup versions.

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One K in 1 Day

The goal of ONE K in 1 DAY is to help 1,000 women get a website up and running online, on the same day. We will show you how simple, fast and hassle-free it can be and that it doesn’t have to cost you more than a handful of dollars, pounds or euros.

Read more and Register: http://startuptrainingschool.com/events/1k-1d/


WordPress ‘Green’ 3.4

The wonderful guys at WordPress have released the next version of our favorite CMS/Blogging solution. Code named ‘Green’, after the famous guitarist ‘Grant Green’; WordPress 3.4 has made several cosmetic changes for bloggers and changes under-the-hood for developers and designers to create ‘magic’ on this wonderful platform!

Enough said… hit the video to see all this and more..

JavaScript required to play Introducing WordPress 3.4 "Green".

 

As always, we advice you to take a backup of your entire site (including plugins and themes) for the just-in-case scenario where your theme or a plugin might conflict with the new release.

We would feel humbled if you use blogvault.net to take care of this backup for you. Psst.. It is free for the first 30 days! 🙂